DETAILED HISTORY
Timeline
103rd Regiment 1910-21
History
Personalities
Traditions
10th Battalion 1914-19
History
St. Julien

 Apr 1915

Festubert

 May 1915

Thiepval/Courcelette

Sep 1916

Vimy Ridge

Apr 1917

Hill 70

Aug 1917

Amiens

Aug 1918

Organization
Personalities
Casualties
Calgary Highlanders 1921-39
Interwar Years
Calgary Highlanders 1939-45
History
Higher Formations
Mobilization 1939
Shilo 1940
England 1940-41
Battle Drill 1941
Dieppe 1942
England 1943
Northwest Europe
Hill 67

19 Jul 44

Clair Tison

12 Aug 44

Dunkirk

8 Sep 44

Wyneghem

22 Sep 44

Battle of the Scheldt
Hoogerheide

2 Oct 44

South Beveland

14 Oct 44

Walcheren Causeway

31 Oct 44

Groningen

 14 Apr 45

Gruppenbühren

26 Apr 45

Organization & Histories
Scouts & Snipers
"A" Company
"B" Company
"C" Company
"D" Company
18 Platoon
Support Company
Anti-Tank Platoon
Mortar Platoon
Personnel
Company Commanders
"A" Company - Jun 1944
"A" Coy Jun 44 Casualties
Personalities
Casualties
Weather 1944-45
2nd Battalion
Homecoming 1945
Calgary Highlanders
1945-today
The War in Afghanistan
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Organization

Warfare in the 20th Century became increasingly complex as the modernization and industrialization of the 19th Century increased the lethality of weapons on the battlefield. Tactics were modified to reflect the new capabilities of these weapons - though as in past wars, disease (specifically, influenza) was still destined to kill more people than the battlefield - and with it, new systems of organization. The infantry entered the First World War with the company of 200 men as the primary unit of maneuver. By 1917, the platoon of 40 men, and even the section of ten or a dozen soldiers, came to be the most effective size of sub-unit that could be immediately controlled and effectively employed for specific missions.

The Canadian Expeditionary Force

Canada's overseas army as a whole was known as the Canadian Expeditionary Force, or C.E.F. This field force was a legal entity unto itself, separate from the Militia at home from which it drew many of its soldiers, in addition to volunteers from civilian life.

The Canadian Corps

The Canadian Corps was formed in 1915 as a field headquarters to control the activities of the main field units in France; the most important of these units were the four infantry divisions (the 10th Battalion was assigned to the 1st Division). Each division was further divided into brigades. At each level of the corps were various supporting units - artillery, engineers, medical, service, ordnance, etc. There were also many units of the C.E.F. that were not part of the Canadian Corps structure, both in France and the U.K.

 


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